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Written by Brianna Giruzzi, Published on November 13, 2018

Due to the close relationships of motor function, language, and self care skills, there is a natural overlap between speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs). Their common ground becomes even more apparent when treating patients with cognitive deficits. As a new grad SLP, you may not know what is appropriate on the job. There are many creative ways OTs and SLPs can work side-by-side while still ensuring the unique sanctity of their professions.

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Topics:Clinical

Written by Caroline Snow, Published on October 30, 2018

Like with any goal, whether it be speech related or personal, we are much more successful in achieving the goal when the parameters and tasks are clearly laid out, with measurable terms and in a specific context. Yet in a field as vast as speech pathology you will find that there are many different ways goals are expected to be written, depending on whether you are in a medical or educational type of facility. How you write effective goals can affect how you carry out treatment towards those goals.

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Topics:billingClinicalinsurancemedically-basedpaperworkwriting

Written by Givona Sandiford, Published on October 9, 2018

You’re a new grad! Congratulations! All your hard work has paid off and you’re now ready to enter the work force! You’ve landed a great job evaluating minimally verbal preschoolers and children with autism. You soon find those lengthy evaluations you learned to do in grad school are perhaps not as practical as they once seemed. What is now valued is time – and you find you have very little of it now. What do you do?

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Topics:Clinicalevaluationspatient communicationpediatricssettings

Written by Erin Coulter, Published on August 28, 2018

As a new clinician, I struggled with providing cognitive therapy to my patients with dementia. I would give them word finds, crossword puzzles, and other simple worksheets to pass the time; however, while this material may have been stimulating them, I did not understand the purpose or see the benefit. That’s when I started asking questions and researching.

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Topics:Clinicalcognitive therapydementiatips for new grads

Written by Michelle Badagliacca MS, CCC-SLP, TSSLD, Published on August 7, 2018

As a Speech Language Pathologist working in Early Intervention, it can be daunting when you are traveling from home to home and family to family. Keeping things simple is the key to effective speech therapy. Here are some tips to get you started:

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Topics:Clinicalearly interventionpediatricstips for new grads

Written by Kathryn (Kay) Grimm, Published on December 19, 2017

If you choose to work with children, you will undoubtedly encounter children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The Center for Disease Control currently estimates that 1 in 68 children have ASD. Since symptoms can be seen as early as 6 months, early identification of autism is key for providing care.

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Topics:asdautismClinicalSLPspeech